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Residents oppose new homes scheme for farmer's field

By The Cornishman  |  Posted: May 21, 2013

Comments (9)

Residents in the Cornish village of Lelant have launched a campaign to oppose the building of more than 20 homes in a farmer's field.

They fear the new development on the road to Carbis Bay – and one for 15 homes on the other side of the busy arterial route to St Ives – could lead to Lelant being swallowed up by its bigger neighbours.

Where Carbis Bay ends and St Ives begins is almost indistinguishable after decades of creeping development and residents of Lelant – a village since 1170 – fear the same fate.

They also say that new housing behind homes on Tyringham Road should be blocked because the site is a greenfield near an Site of Special Scientific Interest – the wild bird habitat at Lelant Saltings.

Many feel Lelant cannot cope with these 21 homes or the 15 opposite that were given approval in June after an appeal to HM Planning Inspector.

The village has no shop, school or GP and Tyringham Action Group, which has launched a website as well as Twitter and Facebook pages, says it cannot take any more people.

However, the landowner seeking outline planning permission for the 21-home development, farmer Patrick McCotter, says he is simply trying to help people buy homes where they live.

His application is for 13 affordable homes and eight more expensive ones on the seaward side of Tyringham Road. Mr McCotter, a resident of Lelant for 25 years and a vet in Hayle, said the protesters do not represent the feelings of people he has spoken to in the village.

He said: "I have been approached by young people, and some older people, who were born and bred in Lelant, who cannot afford a house here and want to stay in the village. That's the main reason for what I'm doing. I've gone through all the requirements, a bird survey and a flood survey, I've done all the right things.

"I want to build these houses for everyone in Lelant. And I am giving everyone in Tyringham Road the chance to have off-road parking where I build. I want affordable houses for people who were born in Lelant."

More than 60 people have lodged objections to the plan on the Cornwall Council planning website.

Paul Woodward, spokesman for Tyringham Action Group, said: "This will adversely affect the character of our ancient village.

"Lelant has no infrastructure. It has no shop and no school, no health facilities.

"The site is also 500m away from a Site of Special Scientific Interest.

"We fear that it may also herald more development, with Carbis Bay expanding towards Lelant and the two encroaching on each other, losing the embarkation line between them and becoming a sprawl."

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9 comments

  • Doitdreckley  |  May 17 2013, 9:04AM

    Back in the early 70s this village had a variety of half a dozen shops, several working farms and considerable open space in part owned by the church. They sold it for a fat profit and the car and changing habits gradually destroyed the shops. Big houses were and continue to be built on land where several smaller more in local demand houses could go and the population doubling has put green space under pressure though recreational use. People should have complained decades ago but of course many/most of them still lived up country then.

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  • Dantwo  |  May 16 2013, 10:17PM

    It may have escaped the notice of some of the moronic contributions to this debate that we grow food on farmland. Millions of acres have already been lost to development over the last decade and that, at a time, when building was supposedly slowing down. So as our population rises our ability to feed ourselves declines. The answer to meeting housing need is to reduce the population to a sustainable level (leaving the EU would be a good start) and then start building unfashionable tower blocks in our main towns.

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  • jimjams2011  |  May 16 2013, 8:24PM

    What a load of Rot by the people of lelant. Maybe they might have some more local services if more people had somewhere to live. no sympathy.

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  • catweazel  |  May 16 2013, 4:52PM

    For "Affordable Housing" read housing bought up by developers then rented out to people who have never lived in the village as well as the inevitable Social Housing. Will the developers stand up and say affordable housing for locals only? No chance because they are not obligated to. The government's definition is "Affordable housing is social rented, affordable rented and intermediate housing, provided to eligible households whose needs are not met by the market. Eligibility is determined with regard to local incomes and local house prices" Affordable Housing is a con, always has been.

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  • BobToronto  |  May 16 2013, 1:40PM

    Perhaps planners should halt all 'green field' residential development while at the same time reducing zoning rules on existing built-up areas especially on bus routes. Five storey or so developments would increase density and enable residents to not use their cars so often. Affordable housing is a red herring. What is required is more housing units. Government only role is safety standards for the construction and that water, sewer connections are there and adequate. Nimby rules enabling construction of new homes to be stopped or delayed should be relaxed. Time is money and planning delays just increases costs. Make the market work!

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  • goldenoldy  |  May 16 2013, 1:16PM

    To Josdave I say that this is my whole point, I have first hand experience of local affordable developements in three locations where young hopefuls queued at the gates for days only to find that the properties had been mysteriously sold over the phone's as soon as they were available, a large block in Bristol got snatched by a developement company who up-spec'ed and resold at vast profits places built for young people trying to afford homes where they worked.We need some kind of regulation to stop this orgy of greed.

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  • josdave  |  May 16 2013, 12:27PM

    Same old story - " I've got my nice expensive house why should someone less well off than I have a house they can afford which will lower the tone of the neighbourhood? " I do agree that these houses should only be made available to first time buyers and they should be vetted to make sure that is the case.

    Rate   3
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  • josdave  |  May 16 2013, 12:26PM

    Same old story - " I've got my nice expensive house why should someone less well off than I have a house they can afford which will lower the tone of the neighbourhood? " I do agree that these houses should only be made available to first time buyers and they should be vetted to make sure that is the case.

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  • josdave  |  May 16 2013, 12:26PM

    Same old story - " I've got my nice expensive house why should someone less well off than I have a house they can afford which will lower the tone of the neighbourhood? " I do agree that these houses should only be made available to first time buyers and they should be vetted to make sure that is the case.

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  • goldenoldy  |  May 16 2013, 11:57AM

    The old Affordable for locals scam again eh? what always happens is that dummy buyers and landlords snap up these houses and then rent them out at rents that require housing benefit from the local council which comes out of the ratepayers pocket and loses the community assets it needs. It should be transparent to all who is buying and at what price, also they should not be able to profit from the house in a quick sale.

    Rate   14
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