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Town and country will gain from new market

By Western Morning News  |  Posted: August 20, 2014

  • The move to a purpose-built new site has been financed by selling the market site to Tesco. Pictures by Ian Snell

  • The old buildings and the sheep pens at Holsworthy would have needed costly updating in the near future

  • Kivells has been selling everything from livestock to entire estates for many years in Holsworthy. These posters decorate the firm’s town centre offices

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Holsworthy market has been at the centre of trade for the whole rural district that surrounds the town for generations.

And it is not only the market that has done brisk business on Wednesdays – the traditional market day for many years.

The rest of the town has benefited too, as farmers and their families have come into town to combine buying and selling livestock with picking up the other essentials from Holsworthy’s local shops.

Inevitably the move out of town has prompted concerns about some of the town’s traders that their business will suffer.

But James Morrish of Kivells, is confident the £7 million investment in the new market will prove to be good news, not just for the livestock trade, but for Holsworthy in general.

“It will give a great opportunity for the town,” he said. “Hoppa busses will offer a free service all day from the new site into town.

“There are four banks in Holsworthy, all of which have an arm dedicated to agriculture.

“We have got a couple of butchers and bakers in town and I believe this new agriculture centre will bring even more business to the town.”

He said construction work on the new market had already given a boost to Holsworthy, with a number of contractors staying in town during the main part of the build, booking into local hotels and using the pubs, restaurants and shops.

And he said Kivells would be doing all it could to ensure the transition from the century-old market to the new one went as smoothly as possible and that trade did not suffer in the town. The old site will undergo a transformation when buyers Tesco put up a new store, with housing. Their purchase of the site has enabled Torridge Council to fund the new market.

One of the founders of the concept of an agricentre, Councillor Des Shadrick, died four years ago, but his wife and son, Marjorie and Alec Shadrick, have maintained a strong family interest in its creation.

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