Login Register

Orphaned seals moved to RSPCA's Taunton rescue centre

By WMNAGreenwood  |  Posted: December 14, 2013

  • Undated handout issued by the RSPCA of seal pups orphaned by the recent floods and have been taken in by the East Winch Wildlife Centre in Norfolk.

  • Undated handout issued by the RSPCA of seal pups orphaned by the recent floods and have been taken in by the East Winch Wildlife Centre in Norfolk.

  • Undated handout issued by the RSPCA of seal pups orphaned by the recent floods and have been taken in by the East Winch Wildlife Centre in Norfolk.

Comments (1)

A number of sick and injured seals which were orphaned in the recent floods on the east coast have been transferred to the RSPCA West Hatch Wildlife Centre in Taunton, Somerset.

Six seals have been taken to the centre in a bid to help ease the pressure on the East Winch Wildlife Centre which is currently at capacity after taking in dozens of orphaned seals. Another six seals were previously taken to Stapeley Grange Wildlife Centre in Cheshire.

The Norfolk wildlife centre is now home to more than 100 seals, many of which are less than three weeks old.

Staff and volunteers have now begun the mammoth task of rehabilitating the orphaned grey seal pups with the aim of returning them to the wild.

West Hatch centre manager Peter Venn said: “In emergency crisis situations like the one East Winch is dealing with at the moment we all really need to pull together and help in any way we can.

“Compared to what they are dealing with the half a dozen sick pups may not seem much but together with the six seals sent to Stapeley this means there are 12 fewer seals for East Winch to manage. It is the tip of the iceberg – but everything helps.

“This is one of the biggest seal related disasters the RSPCA has ever seen. These poor little pups would not have had much chance of survival with the help from the charity. They are just too young to be able to cope without their mums.”

The flooding happened at one of the worst times for seals because it is at the height of the grey seal pupping season which means most of the seals should still be dependent on their mother’s milk.

Do you have something to say? Leave your comment here...

max 4000 characters
  • groundnut  |  December 13 2013, 2:02PM

    An interesting article on the real everyday life of the dedicated RSPCA staff throughout the country in doing what they can for Wildlife. Several National Newspapers including the Daily Mail this week, have produced articles attempting to discredit this organisation. But in difficult times the RSPCA and its caring workforce are the final link, in animal rescue, animal abuse and illegal activities involving animals. It is a charity, a large one, which needs competent and strong leadership. that is no different to any successful commercial organisation. It also like most , has financial and other constraints on its services. But Newspapers and others do not be so quick to attempt to discredit. It is the RSPCA dedicated staff who are left to pick up the pieces. As can be seen by just one operation, like the East Coast storms, and its Seal rescue.

    Rate 0
    Report

      YOUR COMMENTS AWAITING MODERATION

       
       

      MORE NEWS HEADLINES

       
       
       

      MOST POPULAR