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Devon and Cornwall communities left empty by scourge of second homes

By Western Morning News  |  Posted: November 19, 2012

  • Mousehole-born Leon Pezzack has seen the village's way of life change out of all recognition during his lifetime, largely because of the effect of second homes. Left: A sign illustrates the strong feelings of some local people PHIL MONCKTON

  • Picture-postcard-pretty Salcombe is just one of the many communities in Cornwall and Devon where more than half of the properties are now second homes

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An Office for National Statistics report reveals that Cornwall now has the highest number of second homes in the country, with South Devon in fourth place. Simon Parker examines the long-term effect on communities where properties stand empty for most of the year.

The homes are looking pretty, the gardens groomed, windows gleam with fresh paint and there's nothing out of place. The village is looking picture postcard perfect – a veritable chocolate box. But where are all the people?

Well, the folks at Rose Cottage are back home in Knightsbridge, the couple from the top of the hill are at their other place in the Scottish Highlands and Mr and Mrs Whatsit who bought the old rectory spend most of their time on a yacht in the Med. Delightful people, every one. They always come down at Christmas. And sometimes for a week in the summer. You can't miss them. Soft-tops and squeaky tyres, smart slacks and loafers. Always happy to stop for a (loud) chat. And generous, too, offering to take charge of any number of village institutions.

It's easy to poke fun at second-home owners or paint caricatures of them, but the fact remains that while as individuals they make little impact, collectively their kind have altered the fabric of many communities in Cornwall and Devon – rarely for the better. Closed schools and post offices, grocery shops selling trinkets, the rot is deep and seemingly permanent. Figures show that almost every community in Cornwall and Devon now has at least one second home, while in a handful of places the ratio is a staggering 75 per cent. It equates to an average across Cornwall alone of one in 20 properties. The latest Office for National Statistics indicate that some 10,169 people in England and Wales now own second homes in Cornwall – the highest in the country. And this figure doesn't take into account those from abroad who have a stake in the region's property stock

Over the past two decades, long-term residents in almost every town and village have watched helplessly as once-workaday communities striving to bring up families and build on the past have effectively been transformed into playgrounds for the selfish.

It's tough enough in the less-glamorous corners of the region, but for Padstow, Roseland, Porlock, Salcombe and others, the battle is lost. Lively with visitors during a few summer holiday weeks, crammed at Christmas, but for months in bleak November and February resembling ghost towns.

At 73, Leon Pezzack has seen every phase of these changes at first hand. A Mousehole man born and bred, Leon is not afraid to speak his mind on the subject. Today, seven out of ten properties in his home village are either second "homes" or holiday lets.

"Second homes have ruined this village and many more besides," he said. "The shift from permanent residency to part-time represents a disintegration of our society. How can these people be involved in village life if they're not here for most of the year?"

Leaning on a railing overlooking The Cliff this week, Leon was far from sanguine about the future of the village his family has cherished for generations. The son of a carpenter and grandson of fishermen, he has witnessed the character of his home change out of all recognition in just 20 years. Family and community bonds that remained rock solid for generations have been swept away on a tide of profiteering, assisted by an absence of preventative legislation.

"To begin with it was quite gradual," reflects Leon as he scans the waterfront properties, counting those lived in full-time on one hand.

"The big changes came in the Thatcher years. Properties were suddenly seen by wealthy Londoners in particular as commercial opportunities rather than 'homes'. Suddenly, cottages were being bought up for next to nothing, done up, sold on – but not lived in. These people saw the houses not as places to live but as business opportunities. This has happened ever since, with the prices continuing to go up and up. Places are sold over and over again but never lived in full time. This has had a terrible effect on village life."

Leon and his wife Sylvia, who set up Mousehole's biennial maritime festival a few years ago as a way of helping to preserve some of the village's seagoing traditions, believe if the community has any future it must retain its links with the past.

"If people don't understand what built Mousehole we can't hope to build a future," said Leon. "Otherwise the village will become like anywhere else. Children in particular need to have a sense of place."

Earlier this month – as at Christmas and New Year – the population of Mousehole briefly swelled as the village filled up with part-time residents, down for half-term week.

"There were dozens of youngsters going round the village, knocking on people's doors for Halloween," said Leon. "But I didn't know one of them. It's not very long ago that I knew every boy and girl and knew their parents. That's all changed with second homes. Down for half-term and gone again. They may be very nice people, but they're killing village life."

Sylvia is keen to stress the distinction between newer full-time residents – who, she says, contribute hugely to the life of Mousehole, its organisations and community life – and those who visit their properties only once or twice a year.

"There are a lot of very nice people who have moved into the village," said Sylvia. "And without their hard work and commitment a lot more things would have already come to a halt."

Sylvia doesn't blame Mousehole people themselves for making the most of properties that might have been in their family for generations: by selling at a high price, the current generation is able move to newer, often more spacious properties in nearby Newlyn and Penzance and have a decent sum left over.

Leon added: "The reality is that local people simply can't afford to live here now. There are places going for huge sums. What working person with a family can afford such inflated prices for little places that were once fish lofts?

"A lot of people differentiate between summer lets and second homes but I don't see the difference really because the effect on village life is exactly the same. The fact is that second homes have killed Mousehole's family way of life forever."

The couple have two grown-up sons who live away. Their daughter, Debbie, died suddenly five years ago from a rare heart condition. A keen rower, Debbie was, like her parents, determined to work for Mousehole's future.

"I am now the last Pezzack in Mousehole," said Leon. "And I can rant and rage all I like but I have no power to do anything about it."

With only one non-tourist shop left in the former fishing port, entire rows of houses standing empty for much of the year and numbers falling at the village school, the Pezzacks are not optimistic.

"Rock has gone, Cadgwith has gone, St Mawes has gone," said Leon. "Mousehole will soon be gone too."

He looks back across the waterfront to properties once all inhabited by people he knew.

"Some nights you can come down on to the harbour and there's hardly a light on," he said. "The old Lobster Pot restaurant used to employ 20 people. Now it's six luxury flats. None of them are lived in. See that yard there? Four houses – only one lived in. There were families in every one of them not so long ago."

His voice trails off.

"Empty, empty, empty..."

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  • Newboy  |  December 10 2012, 9:00AM

    Hi youngcornwall, just to make it clear, i didnt expect that local people would stop selling their properties, they are of course fortunate enough to have possession of a property that has a high value, its their right to benefit from selling it to somebody, anybody, they wish. I was meaning to point out that comments against incomers buying locals property are futile and in fact counter productive to building new communities. Its one way of bringing some of the wealth generated in the rest of the country into Cornwall, it used to be the tin that did that, now its property, tourism and of course agriculture. Play to your strengths Cornwall, you have most of the county in love with you. No incomers that i have met wish to do any harm, quite the opposite.

    |   1
  • stevepz  |  December 08 2012, 10:38AM

    Is it any surprise the Cornish cant afford a home down here. We chase away investment. I am not talking about the wind and solar farms that are of no benefit. I am talking about infrastructure and port developments. Investments in tourism. House building. We have sent the message that Cornwall is closed for business and then moan when we don't have any jobs or money.

    |   5
  • pandddawso  |  December 07 2012, 6:10PM

    There's a reason why property in idyllic villages falls into disrepair - it's called unemployment. It comes about as traditional ways of earning a living peter out. When this happens, either you hang on to your crumbling idyllic home in a picturesque village and subsist on benefits, or you do the economically sensible thing, accept the generous offer that's being made, and go and live somewhere nearer the bigger towns where there's more work around. It's never been easy to make a good living in Cornwall - my grandfather and a lot like him travelled the world in search of mining work - it was the only way to keep the family going. What I find irksome is the publicity given to 'changing the way of village life', when not a word is ever breathed about the huge sums of money scooped up by the builders who renovate the properties (flashy new van, every available gadget, wouldn't dream of cooking his own food, legendary beer consumption, at least one holiday a year in Tenerife . . .) or the tidy profits trousered by the estate agents and lawyers who facilitate the purchases (flashy new Audi, every available gadget, eat out most of the time, legendary wine consumption, at least one holiday a year in the Seychelles/West Indies plus frequent short breaks). People who buy 'second homes' 1) contribute vast sums to the local economy in the process and 2) often retire into them when the time comes, after which they contribute more vast sums. They're the people for whom the Gordon Ramsays of the world set up shiny new businesses that provide employment for all those hard-pressed local residents. Mr Prezzack, be honest with yourself, admit that Mousehole's way of life died some time in the last century, and the second home owners are the only thing - bar well-off new residents - between the village and dereliction.

    |   9
  • youngcornwall  |  December 07 2012, 4:59PM

    "and that is for local people to refuse to sell to incomers" And properties like the one that you did up Newboy would just keep on falling further into disrepair, no good to man nor beast, but for some that would be more acceptable, because to do the same as you would be just impossible and far from their wildest dreams, so what is the next best thing? Be dead against anyone with a little bit of incentive and a little bit of get up and go.

    |   4
  • JJLee  |  December 07 2012, 4:45PM

    fully agree jos a blight by josdave Friday, December 07 2012, 1:13PM "Houses that are unoccupied for at least nine months of the year can in no way be described as homes. They are a blight and kill communities up and down the country with their selfish ways."

    |   3
  • Newboy  |  December 07 2012, 2:10PM

    Paddy, I agree with you to an extent. However second home ownership is a very easy trend to stop dead right now, and that is for local people to refuse to sell to incomers, no matter why they are wanting to purchase. This does not need a change in the law, or discriminatory changes in local taxes, just a determination to do so. The answer is therefore in the hands of those who want to stop the rot as you might describe it. So just do that. Any local who fails to do so should seriously consider where they truly stand on the issue. In the meantime, if there is an opportunity, as it seems there is, to recognise how economically dependent Cornwall is on tourism, and to see holiday lets as your friends, then maybe that is worth discussing.

  • PaddyTrembath  |  December 07 2012, 1:47PM

    Newboy wrote:- "Sorry Paddy, but it is, quote from Mr Pezzack: "A lot of people differentiate between summer lets and second homes but I don't see the difference really because the effect on village life is exactly the same. The fact is that second homes have killed Mousehole's family way of life forever." I do appreciate that there is a difference, as do you, but its the article we are commenting on is it not? It does show that some people are just totally intolerant, unlike yourself who can see the difference." Sorry, I was commenting regarding the discussion as opposed to the article. The problem is, that second "homes" are, in my opinion, anti social and cause a great deal of harm to the communities they infest. This creates understandable resentment and ill feeling. Holiday lets are a different kettle of fish, but they can, in excessive numbers, be just as damaging. In places where there are large numbers of holiday lets, community life tends to take a real hammering. Apart from also creating resentment due to this loss, it actually kills the very thing that, I would have thought, makes those areas attractive to holiday makers. Unless all they want is the picturesque views, and have no concern for the community that, not only created those views, (the man made element of them) but also maintain them. You say "Life is too short to be putting barriers in the way of communities trying to reform and evolve as time goes by." Yet the point that people like Leon Pezzack are making is that unless there is some sort of restriction placed upon the removal of houses from residential use, the community will, far from reforming and evolving, cease to exist. A community needs long term members to function, if all you have is numerous, transitory, "members" who spend 1 or 2 weeks a year, you've got nothing. I do not believe that it is a case of intolerance, it is a case of wishing to maintain, preserve, something that you, your family, have been, are, part of.

    |   1
  • josdave  |  December 07 2012, 1:13PM

    Houses that are unoccupied for at least nine months of the year can in no way be described as homes. They are a blight and kill communities up and down the country with their selfish ways.

  • Newboy  |  December 07 2012, 11:37AM

    Sorry Paddy, but it is, quote from Mr Pezzack: "A lot of people differentiate between summer lets and second homes but I don't see the difference really because the effect on village life is exactly the same. The fact is that second homes have killed Mousehole's family way of life forever." I do appreciate that there is a difference, as do you, but its the article we are commenting on is it not? It does show that some people are just totally intolerant, unlike yourself who can see the difference.

    |   3
  • PaddyTrembath  |  December 07 2012, 11:22AM

    Newboy wrote:- "In purchasing my second home............ It is now rented to holiday makers.........." Then, it is NOT a second "home", it is a Holiday let, and not what is being discussed here.

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