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Dartmoor barley makes for pint-sized beer miles

By Western Morning News  |  Posted: February 12, 2013

From left: Cereal farmer Tim Cox, hop grower Wyndham Monk, Dartmoor Brewery's head brewer Mike Lunney and the 'Wag from Widecombe', Tony Beard, celebrate the launch of 100% Dartmoor Malted IPA at Dartmoor Brewery. Left: Turning the malt into grist for the next brew at Tucker's Maltings

From left: Cereal farmer Tim Cox, hop grower Wyndham Monk, Dartmoor Brewery's head brewer Mike Lunney and the 'Wag from Widecombe', Tony Beard, celebrate the launch of 100% Dartmoor Malted IPA at Dartmoor Brewery. Left: Turning the malt into grist for the next brew at Tucker's Maltings

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A Devon farmer is helping Dartmoor Brewery boost the local provenance of its most popular beers.

Cereal farmer Tim Cox is supplying the Princetown-based brewery with the first ever malting barley grown in Dartmoor National Park.

Mr Cox was commissioned by the brewery last year and this week the first pints of 100% Dartmoor Malted IPA will roll out to pubs and restaurants throughout the Westcountry.

Mike Lunney, head brewer at Dartmoor Brewery, said: "Malted barley is the main ingredient for brewing and, although we were already using Dartmoor water, we really wanted Dartmoor barley, but could only source Devon barley.

"Barley from within the Dartmoor National Park gives our beer more provenance and makes it more carbon-friendly too. After many years searching for a supplier, we commissioned experienced cereal farmer Tim Cox to grow for the brewery."

Despite the wet summer and a delayed harvest, Mr Cox was still able to produce grain that passed Dartmoor Brewery's exacting standards.

The brewery uses Tucker's Maltings at Newton Abbot – one of only four malthouses in the country that produce floor-malted barley in the traditional way.

"Tim's land at Drewsteign-ton, a mix of Devon clays and grit, is in the rain shadow area of Dartmoor," Mr Lunney added. "It is one of the few areas on Dartmoor capable of growing grain to a high enough standard.

"It is a tribute to Tim's skill as a farmer that, in a far from easy growing year, the malt passed all the tests.

"We're really proud of this malt used for the Dartmoor IPA as it travels less than 45 miles from the fields to the maltster and then to our brewery.

"As a Dartmoor business we're committed to supporting and protecting our environment and with this barley we are able to reduce our beer miles and support another Dartmoor business."

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